Payday Loan Crack Pipe: Lopker Song



“I just need enough cash to tide me over until payday.” Famous last words.
They greet him oh so sweetly C Em
give him coffee and begin to type Dm G
They present his papers so neatly C Am
and light his loan crack pipe F G G7

He’s livin’ week to week C Em
He’s workin’ to the bone Dm G
He’s eatin’ chicken feet C Em
Hooked on a payday loan Dm G7

He don’t drink, he don’t smoke C Em
never touches any drugs Dm G
He’s hooked on always being broke C Em
and the payday loan-shark thugs Dm G7

They greet him oh so sweetly C Em
give him coffee and begin to type Dm G
They present his papers so neatly C Am
and light his loan crack pipe F G G7

The first one’s free, they said try it out C Em
then he took his first hit of cash Dm G
He felt a rush that left no doubt C Em
this loan would not be his last Dm G7

He tries to stop, but it’s been five years C Em
now he owes over 25K Dm G
with nothing to show but a pool of tears C Em
from eyes that look so far away Dm G7

They greet him oh so sweetly C Em
give him coffee and begin to type Dm G
They present his papers so neatly C Am
and light his loan crack pipe F G G7

Payday Loan Crack Pipe
© Copyright 2014 John Lopker. All Rights Reserved.

The ads are on the radio, television, the Internet, even in the mail. They refer to payday loans, cash advance loans, check advance loans, post-dated check loans, or deferred deposit loans. The Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency, says that regardless of their name, these small, short-term, high-rate loans by check cashers, finance companies and others all come at a very high price.

Here’s how they work: A borrower writes a personal check payable to the lender for the amount the person wants to borrow, plus the fee they must pay for borrowing. The company gives the borrower the amount of the check less the fee, and agrees to hold the check until the loan is due, usually the borrower’s next payday. Or, with the borrower’s permission, the company deposits the amount borrowed — less the fee — into the borrower’s checking account electronically. The loan amount is due to be debited the next payday. The fees on these loans can be a percentage of the face value of the check — or they can be based on increments of money borrowed: say, a fee for every $50 or $100 borrowed. The borrower is charged new fees each time the same loan is extended or “rolled over.”

The federal Truth in Lending Act treats payday loans like other types of credit: the lenders must disclose the cost of the loan. Payday lenders must give you the finance charge (a dollar amount) and the annual percentage rate (APR — the cost of credit on a yearly basis) in writing before you sign for the loan. The APR is based on several things, including the amount you borrow, the interest rate and credit costs you’re being charged, and the length of your loan.

A payday loan — that is, a cash advance secured by a personal check or paid by electronic transfer is very expensive credit. How expensive? Say you need to borrow $100 for two weeks. You write a personal check for $115, with $15 the fee to borrow the money. The check casher or payday lender agrees to hold your check until your next payday. When that day comes around, either the lender deposits the check and you redeem it by paying the $115 in cash, or you roll-over the loan and are charged $15 more to extend the financing for 14 more days. If you agree to electronic payments instead of a check, here’s what would happen on your next payday: the company would debit the full amount of the loan from your checking account electronically, or extend the loan for an additional $15. The cost of the initial $100 loan is a $15 finance charge and an annual percentage rate of 391 percent. If you roll-over the loan three times, the finance charge would climb to $60 to borrow the $100.

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